Quote
"
  1. You are stronger than you realise.
  2. You are crueller than you realise.
  3. The smallest words will break your heart.
  4. You will change. You’re not the same person you were three years ago. You’re not even the same person you were three minutes ago and that’s okay. Especially if you don’t like the person you were three minutes ago.
  5. People come and go. Some are cigarette breaks, others are forest fires.
  6. You won’t like your name until you hear someone say it in their sleep.
  7. You’ll forget your email password but ten years from now you’ll still remember the number of steps up to his flat.
  8. You don’t have to open the curtains if you don’t want to.
  9. Never stop yourself texting someone. If you love them at 4 a.m., tell them. If you still love them at 9.30 a.m., tell them again.
  10. Make sure you have a safe place. Whether it’s the kitchen floor or the Travel section of a bookshop, just make sure you have a safe place.
  11. You will be scared of all kinds of things, of spiders and clowns and eating alone, but your biggest fear will be that people will see you the way you see yourself.
  12. Sometimes, looking at someone will be like looking into the sun. Sometimes someone will look at you like you are the sun. Wait for it.
  13. You will learn how to sleep alone, how to avoid the cold corners but still fill a bed.
  14. Always be friends with the broken people. They know how to survive.
  15. You can love someone and hate them, all at once. You can miss them so much you ache but still ignore your phone when they call.
  16. You are good at something, whether it’s making someone laugh or remembering their birthday. Don’t ever let anyone tell you that these things don’t matter.
  17. You will always be hungry for love. Always. Even when someone is asleep next to you you’ll envy the pillow touching their cheek and the sheet hiding their skin.
  18. Loneliness is nothing to do with how many people are around you but how many of them understand you.
  19. People say I love you all the time. Even when they say, ‘Why didn’t you call me back?’ or ‘He’s an asshole.’ Make sure you’re listening.
  20. You will be okay.
  21. You will be okay.
"

21 things my father never told me (via motelstyles)

Well, there you go.

(Source: ohthativy, via noteverythinghastochange)

Photoset

jellobatch:

nudiemuse:

cultureisnotacostume:

thenewwomensmovement:

sydneyflapper:

nudiemuse:

ersassmus:

African American flappers and Jazz Age women

HOLY SHIT I HAVE NEVER SEEN BLACK FLAPPERS BEFORE!

There were many fabulous African American flappers. No wonder - it was African American musicians who put the Jazz in “The Jazz Age”! The Charleston dance iteself, which so epitomizes the era, made its debut in the all-Black musical “Runnin’ Wild”, and no one danced that flapper number better than Josephine Baker…save possibly for fellow Black artist Florence Mills, who claimed credit for inventing it (she said she debuted it in her “Plantation Revue” in the early 20s, developing it from a dance popular among slaves). The Charleston song was written by Black composer James P Johnson. Without women and girls like those above, the 1920s would never have roared.

I think it’s so easy to forget that we, WOC, were there in history too.

The flapper movement was originally started by WOC, and that was part of the reason why it was so scandalous for white women to be flappers at first—because they were dressing and acting line WOC. But of course you’ll never see that in a high school textbook.

-Allyssa

I will reblog again for commentary.

Also think about it like this. I am 36 years old. THIRTY SIX and beyond Josephine Baker prior to these images I had never seen Jazz Age WOC.

Let that sink in.

36 years old and it wasn’t necessarily for lack of effort. 

The powers that be have completely erased us from our own history.

(Source: ciptochat, via vimandvigour)

Photo
gentlemanlosergentlemanjunkie:

(via If Charlie Parker Was a Gunslinger,There’d Be a Whole Lot of Dead Copycats: Unknown Model, Unknown Year #12)

Linda DugeauFounded  The Motor Maids of America in 1940.America’s first women’s motorcycling organisation 

gentlemanlosergentlemanjunkie:

(via If Charlie Parker Was a Gunslinger,There’d Be a Whole Lot of Dead Copycats: Unknown Model, Unknown Year #12)

Linda Dugeau
Founded  The Motor Maids of America in 1940.
America’s first women’s motorcycling organisation 

(via timetravelteam)

Photo
phaidoncom:

Danny Lyon, The Gary Rogues at the Dunes, Indiana. From the series Bikeriders (1963)

phaidoncom:

Danny Lyon, The Gary Rogues at the Dunes, Indiana. From the series Bikeriders (1963)

(via americabymotorcycle)

Photo
poboh:

Three little boys on suitcase, Penn Station, ca 1947, Ruth Orkin. (1921 - 1985)

poboh:

Three little boys on suitcase, Penn Station, ca 1947, Ruth Orkin. (1921 - 1985)

(via americabymotorcycle)

Photo
jeannecrains:

Julie Gibson, Noel Neill, Gloria Saunders and Kay Scott, 1940’s

jeannecrains:

Julie Gibson, Noel Neill, Gloria Saunders and Kay Scott, 1940’s

(via exoticspices)

Photo
retrogasm:

What? No diamonds…

Lucy was in the sky with diamonds…

retrogasm:

What? No diamonds…

Lucy was in the sky with diamonds…

(via timetravelteam)

Photo

(Source: cosmosonic)

Photo
natgeofound:

A sportsman shows off a mounted salmon to his friends in New Hampshire, April 1943.Photograph by B. Anthony Stewart, National Geographic

natgeofound:

A sportsman shows off a mounted salmon to his friends in New Hampshire, April 1943.
Photograph by B. Anthony Stewart, National Geographic

Photo
natgeofound:

An informal group portrait of Amish children in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, 1937.Photograph by J. Baylor Roberts, National Geographic

natgeofound:

An informal group portrait of Amish children in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, 1937.Photograph by J. Baylor Roberts, National Geographic